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is this group still active?

i am in search of some natto starter and tempeh starters. please. i am in the uk. can anyone help?

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Hello all,

I've got a pretty big, healthy supply of water kefir grains to share, if anyone is interested. My grains multiply too fast for my needs, so I've got an abundance at the moment.
I only ask that you pay for shipping- otherwise, they're free. : )
Take care, everyone!

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So happy to have found this great community! I am trying out my first sourdough starter (S. Katz, basic recipe) and plan to use apples as my source for wild yeast. Have you used apples for yeast in sourdough starter? In your experience or reading, how does the apple-started sourdough's flavor differ from other wild-yeast-started sourdoughs?

Edit: Or, more generally, how's your sourdough doing lately?

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Hello to all,

I recently have become fascinated with cultured foods. Right now I'm starting sourdough and kombucha, and I just made yogurt. I have been reading a lot about kefir, and I would like to grow some.

I read on Dom's highly informative website (http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/kefirpage.html) that there is a difference between "man-made, commercially-prepared non-kefir grains" and "real kefir grains." He spends quite a while explaining the difference. Two of the reasons he gives are that 1) the milk in any commercial product, at least in the United States, will not be fresh, and 2) In commercial kefir starters, a few select organisms are isolated from the kefir grains.

If that claim is true, could any of you share your real kefir with me? Or tell me a cheap, honest place I can order some? I live in the Tampa Bay area of Florida, if that matters. (And if you don't think the claim is true, what do you think?)

Thank you, and good luck in your cultured-food adventures.
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Hello. New member here.

This is my second attempt at ginger beer. The first time I tried making it in a different way that involved fermenting for a longer duration, using this recipe: http://www.chelseagreen.com/content/recipe-ginger-beer/
It didn't work out so well so I tried making a simpler version for now and will eventually try the above recipe again sometime soon.

So the results of this batch were decent, not exactly what I wanted but OK. Here is what I did this time: http://silkfetus.livejournal.com/71894.html

Anyway, I just have some questions about the sediment at the bottom of the pitcher. There is some slightly hard white sediment that sticks to the bottom of the pitcher. I'm assuming that this is just naturally occurring yeast and is perfectly normal and safe but wanted to make sure. Also, I was wondering if I could somehow save this stuff for making a future fermented ginger beer. If it makes a difference the pitcher is in the refrigerator now and has been for the past several hours.

Thanks for any help.
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After several unsuccessful tries a few months ago, I'm attempting a sourdough starter again. But you know what? If anyone has a good, reliable starter, I would be VERY willing to trade for it, at this point! =) I can trade for kefir grains or a  kombucha scoby, but both would have to wait a couple of weeks. Alternatively, I'd also be happy to just pay shipping (or pay a small price, I'm pretty broke though).

Also, in case I don't get any replies, what are good, reliable places to get starters online?

TIA!

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So, I made my first sourdough starter in the university dorms, and I had to move out just as it was getting hot as heck. My sourdough starter came with me, and I was getting a good rise out of it, and very good flavour.

I saw somewhere that if I sourdough starter's hooch goes orange or pink - it's the wrong beasties in your stuff. I panicked, and the sourdough starter went into the sink - the hooch looked like very dark urine. Should I have panicked? I have more of the original starter that didn't change color on me - it's dried and in a ziplock bag.

What happened to the starter? Was it because I suffocated it (it was in it's jar, but with plastic wrap on top)? Or was it the heat? How can I avoid killing my starter again?

My set up:
- glass jar with loose fitting top
- paper lunch bag (I don't trust light in my kitchen)
- plastic bowl and spoon for feeding it slurry

PS - I have made more of the starter, and it hasn't done a Houndini in color on me...so I'm happy - I also made some sourdough drop biscuits from them - tasty!
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hey everyone!
this is my very first SCOBY. the underside of it, however, has this scummy-looking brown spot (that was actually the first part of the SCOBY to form, a while ago) and i wanted to make sure it was normal. as you can see i tried breaking off that layer of the SCOBY, but without much luck.

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So they seem to be all right, though there is some serious white bubbly foam at the top. Sandor Katz says to skim off mold, but I'm assuming this bubbly action is not a mold? Will there be a mold hiding in it?
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I have my sourdough starter going in a ceramic bowl and add flour and water every day. It seems to dry out easily and as soon as it dries out mold starts forming on it. I scrape that layer off and it keeps going, but it would be nice to not have to be so particular about stirring it two or three times a day so it doesn't get crusty. Can it be stored in a covered container (so as not to get crusty?)...
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